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Saturday, November 10, 2007

Ancient Egypt plagued by Zombies

LOL. I had to pass this along as I almost laughed myself silly over this. As you may know, I love ancient history, archaeology, and mythology. I read a lot of articles about those subject and came across this story that seems a little out there to me.

There is a somewhat famous carving found in Egypt known as the Narmer Palette, that depicts what many thought was a king decapitating those he'd conquered in war. Many archaeologists have found burials of headless bodies scattered across the Egyptian sands. Now, there is a new theory that these people weren't victims of war, but victims of a deadly virus called Solunum. Apparently this virus is what causes people to become zombies.

According to the article, there is proof that this stelae depicts the first evidence of an actual zombie attack, and that these people were decapitated in order to end said attack. I'm not sure I believe that zombies attacked the ancient people of Egypt, but then again, I keep seeing all those ole movies in the back of my head. Remember the movie Dawn of the Dead? Now I know what they were talking about. LOL

Read the article and make your own decisions. There is a lot more to it than I've posted here, but I still think it's kind of funny.

4 comments:

Forest Parks said...

That is hilarious!!

I have heard of a village somewhere (not sure even what region!!) where the locals are so screwed on weird drugs they use from the forest that they could easily be mistaken for zombies.

I saw it all on tv when I was a kid, wish I remembered the details!!

sapheyerblu said...

I think I remember hearing something about that myself. And I always thought Zombies were something that Hollywood invented. LOLOLOL

Thanks for the comment

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